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F1 should scrap plans for Sprint races, says Verstappen

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Verstappen has stated on numerous occasions that he is not a fan of F1 Sprints, but the sport has moved forward with plans to expand the format regardless.
A top Formula One executive has once again defended the divisive Sprint format, which Max Verstappen despises, as the sport prepares to double the number of short-form races this year.
Qualifying is moved to Friday from its usual Saturday slot, and is replaced by what is essentially a shorter version of a race. As usual, the main Grand Prix takes place on Sunday. Some people like it because it provides more competitive action to watch than the average race weekend. However, it is not universally accepted, with many detractors claiming that the shorter races are often little more than a procession because teams do not want to risk too much for fewer points.
Pat Symonds, F1’s chief technical officer, has spoken out on the subject as the sport prepares for six Sprint races in 2023, up from three in each of the previous two seasons.
“There are those who like it and those who don’t like it, but to me, what we do is compete,” he explained.
“What I enjoy about a competition is that it is unpredictable. Oxford were playing Arsenal in the FA Cup the other week and held them 0-0 at halftime, which is fantastic. Friday does not provide any competition during a typical grand prix weekend, so what is the appeal of it?
This is where you come in. Furthermore, the teams are so good at simulation these days that they have two hours of running time on Friday to fine-tune the car and ensure that everything is in order, which leads to predictability.
“What the sprint does is it allows us to have a competition on every day – because on Friday we’ve got qualifying, on Saturday we’ve got a sprint race and on Sunday, we’ve got a grand prix. In my opinion, it accomplishes this without detracting from the main event, which is critical because a grand prix is what it’s all about.
“And by reducing the amount of time the teams have got to hone their cars, by putting in another error-generator in the Sprint race, we have the chance to have a little bit of a more mixed up race. Those are the races that people prefer.”
Verstappen recently told reporters, “For me, that’s not really a race, because you go into the main race and you know there’s way more points available anyway, you just risk a bit more there,” later adding, “You just risk a bit more there.”